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Nam Annihilates Melbourne!

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The letter T!he Gods have spoken and Nam Sung-Wook is your Grand Prix Melbourne 2014 Champion!Defeating local hero Patty Robertson in the finals, Nam also makes history by becoming the first South Korean player to win a Grand Prix. To make this moment even more special, his victory comes from ousting over 900 other players in Australia's largest ever tournament.

Semifinalists Wei Yifan and Ash Webster have also tried their best to defend the trophy and they should not be disappointed to return home with a hefty prize check, along with airfare and a much-coveted invitation to Pro Tour Journey to Nyx.

Rounding off the rest of the top 8 include four-time Grand Prix Top 8 competitor Huang Hao-Shan from Taiwan, Pro Tour Born of the Gods Top 16 competitor Zheng Jingwei as well as Luke McGlaughlin and Craig Chapman. Congratulations to all, and may the Gods be with you!




Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Finals   Champion
1 Yifan Wei   Yifan Wei, 2-1        
8 Huang Hao-Shan   Patty Robertson, 2-0
       
4 Joe Zheng Jingwei   Patty Robertson, 2-1   Nam Sung-Wook, 2-1
5 Patty Robertson    
       
2 Ash Webster   Ash Webster, 2-1
7 Craig Chapman   Nam Sung-Wook, 2-0
       
3 Nam Sung-Wook   Nam Sung-Wook, 2-0
6 Luke McGlaughlin    









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  Streaming video coverage of Grand Prix Melbourne provided by Ray Walkinshaw, Riley Knight, Marshall Sutcliffe, Pro Tour Hall of Famer Randy Buehler, Rashad Miller, and Marco Saez.


EVENT COVERAGE INFORMATION
 1.  Nam Sung-wook $4,000
 2.  Patty Robertson $2,700
 3.  Yifan Wei $1,500
 4.  Ash Webster $1,500
 5.  Zheng Jingwei $1,000
 6.  Luke McGlaughlin $1,000
 7.  Craig Chapman $1,000
 8.  Huang Hao-Shan $1,000
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  • Top 8 Decklists

    by Chapman Sim


  • Zheng Jingwei
    Grand Prix Melbourne 2014 – Top 8 (Standard)


    Wei Yifan
    Grand Prix Melbourne 2014 – Top 8 (Standard)


    Patty Robertson
    Grand Prix Melbourne 2014 – Top 8 (Standard)


    Luke McGlaughlin
    Grand Prix Melbourne 2014 – Top 8 (Standard)


    Nam Sung-Wook
    Grand Prix Melbourne 2014 – Top 8 (Standard)



    Huang Hao-Shan
    Grand Prix Melbourne 2014 – Top 8 (Standard)




     

  • Top 8 Profiles

    by Chapman Sim


  • Wei Yifan

    Age: 25
    Hometown: Wollongong, Australia
    Occupation: Student


    What Standard deck are you playing today and why?
    Esper Control. There aren't many bad matchups.

    Day 1 Score:
    9-0 (2 byes)

    Day 2 Score:
    3-1-2

    Pro Tour & Previous Grand Prix Top 8s:
    None

    Other Achievements:
    GP Brisbane Day 2. PTQ Top 8 twice.

    What is your favorite Born of the Gods card?
    Kiora, the Crashing Wave

    Which God's priesthood would you join?
    Thassa, God of the Sea




    Ash Webster

    Age: 20
    Hometown: Perth, Australia
    Occupation: Pool Boy


    What Standard deck are you playing today and why?
    Green Red splash Black, because it makes an already good existing archetype much better and because I like Forests.

    Day 1 Score:
    7-1-1

    Day 2 Score:
    5-0-1

    Pro Tour & Previous Grand Prix Top 8s:
    None

    Other Achievements:
    2nd at a Rookie Tournament, 3-1 at FNM

    What is your favorite Born of the Gods card?
    Charging Badger

    Which God's priesthood would you join?
    Xenagos, God of Revels




    Nam Sung-Wook

    Age: 32
    Hometown: South Korea
    Occupation: Student


    What Standard deck are you playing today and why?
    Mono-Black Devotion. I believe it's the most competitive deck in the current Standard format. And I get to use Thoughtseize.

    Day 1 Score:
    7-0-1 (2 Byes)

    Day 2 Score:
    4-2

    Pro Tour & Previous Grand Prix Top 8s:
    None

    Other Achievements:
    Member of Korean Team for 2008 World Championships and 2013 World Magic Cup Team.

    What is your favorite Born of the Gods card?
    Temple of Enlightenment

    Which God's priesthood would you join?
    Erebos, God of the Dead, of course.




    Joe Zheng Jingwei

    Age: 23
    Hometown: Wellington, New Zealand
    Occupation: Store Owner


    What Standard deck are you playing today and why?
    Unwin U/W Control

    Day 1 Score:
    8-1 (2 Byes)

    Day 2 Score:
    4-1-1

    Pro Tour & Previous Grand Prix Top 8s:
    None

    Other Achievements:
    World Magic Cup Top 8, PT BNG Top 16, GP Auckland Top 16

    What is your favorite Born of the Gods card?
    Temple of Enlightenment

    Which God's priesthood would you join?
    Ephara, God of the Polis




    Patrick Robertson

    Age: 28
    Hometown: Melbourne, Australia
    Occupation: PhD Student


    What Standard deck are you playing today and why?
    Esper Control. Thoughtseize and Sphinx's Revelation are really good!

    Day 1 Score:
    7-2 (2 Byes)

    Day 2 Score:
    5-0-1

    Pro Tour & Previous Grand Prix Top 8s:
    None

    Other Achievements:
    12th at GP Brisbane and once saw Riley Knight in his underwear.

    What is your favorite Born of the Gods card?
    Ephara, God of the Polis

    Which God's priesthood would you join?
    The one where you become a eunuch.




    Luke McGlaughlin

    Age: 21
    Hometown: Adelaide, Australia
    Occupation: Cook


    What Standard deck are you playing today and why?
    Mono-Blue Devotion. Because Yi-Fei said so.

    Day 1 Score:
    7-2

    Day 2 Score:
    5-0-1

    Pro Tour & Previous Grand Prix Top 8s:
    None

    Other Achievements:
    Multiple Games Day Winner

    What is your favorite Born of the Gods card?
    Satyr Firedancer

    Which God's priesthood would you join?
    Ephara, God of the Polis




    Craig Chapman

    Age: 29
    Hometown: Perth, Australia
    Occupation: Father of two


    What Standard deck are you playing today and why?
    Orzhov Midrange. Perth players worked on the list but it was kept secret from me since I'm too powerful. Alas, I found out. GG!

    Day 1 Score:
    7-2

    Day 2 Score:
    5-0-1

    Pro Tour & Previous Grand Prix Top 8s:
    None

    Other Achievements:
    PTQ Winner, Top 4 at Nationals and one Worlds appearance. Also, I make awesome pizza and babies.

    What is your favorite Born of the Gods card?
    Whelming Wave, hands down...

    Which God's priesthood would you join?
    Nylea, God of the Hunt, she has great... personality!




    Huang Hao-Shan

    Age: 31
    Hometown: Taichung, Taiwan
    Occupation: Semi Pro Player, Part-Time Student


    What Standard deck are you playing today and why?
    Red Green Monsters! It's raw power is extremely high and the most consistent among all the decks. Aggro with card drawing? Sure!!!

    Day 1 Score:
    8-1 (3 byes)

    Day 2 Score:
    4-2

    Pro Tour & Previous Grand Prix Top 8s:
    3 Grand Prix Top 8s before this one.

    Other Achievements:
    Over 100 lifetime Pro Points, 2011 Top 4 World Champion Team

    What is your favorite Born of the Gods card?
    Courser of Kruphix, while Xenagos, God of Revels comes in second.






     

  • Quarterfinals - Luke McGlaughlin vs. Nam Sung-Wook

    by Chapman Sim

  • Game One

    In this classic matchup between Mono-Blue Devotion and Mono-Black Devotion, Nam swiftly clinched Game One before I could even get seated. After going down to five cards, McGlaughlin found himself facing one of the most dreaded openings his opponent could present in Standard.


    After duplicating some rodents, McGlaughlin reached for his sideboard and Nam was up one Game just like that.


    McGlaughlin tried to fight back after a double mulligan to no avail.

    Game Two

    McGlaughlin retaliated in Game two, opening aggressively with triple Cloudfin Raptor and double Judge's Familiar. However, Nam did what the Mono-Black Devotion deck ought to be doing and led with Thoughtseize and Pack Rat once again.

    With two Mutavaults on his side, there was a good chance Nam could outrace McGlaughlin's flyers. Nam made a copy of Pack Rat, and then another. Suddenly, McGlaughlin was facing a horde of 5/5s when turn 5 rolled around, and offered the handshake soon after.


    Nam Sung-Wook

    Nam Sung-Wook defeats Luke, McGlaughlin and advances to the semifinals.




     

  • Quarterfinals - Patty Robertson vs. Jingwei Zheng

    by Pip Foweraker

  • The Robertson-Zheng matchup promised to be that classic test of skill, the U/W control mirror. Both decks feature the same core set of cards and become even closer mirrors post-sideboard. A great deal of the matchup will come down to resource and tempo management. Traditionally, players focus on hitting their early land drops so that they can fight more effectively over the powerful late-game spells like Planeswalkers and Sphinx's Revelation. This careful, studious matchup often comes down to a single game in Swiss rounds. The finals are untimed, meaning the players will have to beat each other the 'fair' way.

    The first clash of the game came over Jace, Architect of Thought. Zheng blinked first and had his Jace Syncopated, Robertson resolving his a turn later. The players dug through spells for a few more turns, focussing on hitting their land drops and moving into the later game as rapidly and fluently as possible. Zheng fired off a Sphinx's Revelation, but wasn't able to stop Robertson from resolving an Ætherling. Zheng settled down to glare at the Ætherling and see what he could get done. A Thoughtseize showed Robertson with a hand full of power, with another Jace, a Doom Blade, a pair of Revelations and some Detention Spheres.

    Zheng went for an Elspeth, Sun's Champion, and generated some tokens with her after it resolved. Robertson dropped a Detention Sphere to stop Elspeth from getting too out of hand, but Zheng had another to keep the pressure on. Zheng started generating more tokens, but the unblockable Ætherling was enough for Robertson to take the first game.


    Zheng: You want to kill which dude?

    Patty Robertson 1 - Jingwei Zheng

    Both players started off with early Thoughtseizes, but then didn't do much but play lands for quite a few turns. Robertson tried another Thoughtseize, but it got hit with a Dissolve. Zheng started sneaking in some points of damage with his Mutavault while both players accumulated cards and lands.

    A few turns later, the Mutavault was still going.

    The same thing kept happening. And then the unusual, if not unthinkable, happened: Zheng's Mutavault did a combined total of 18 damage (Plus the earlier Thoughtseize) to take the second game, drawing an appreciative wave of applause from the gathered crowd. All those other, massively powerful spells? Not so relevant in this game.

    Jingwei Zheng 1 - Patty Robertson 1

    A pair of early Thoughtseizes from Robertson cleared out Zheng's Jace's. Zheng tried for a freshly topdecked third, but Robertson had a Syncopate to keep it out of contention. Zheng chuckled when Robertson activated his Mutavault and swung. "Ah, the bitter taste of my own medicine', Zheng grinned as he adjusted his life total.


    Robertson: THIS ONE. I KILL THIS ONE.

    Zheng summoned an Elspeth, Sun's Champion to slow down the Mutavault, but Robertson had a Detention Sphere to keep it out of play. Robertson cast a Supreme Judgment to clear out the Elspeth tokens, holding a copy of the Planeswalker in hand but needing an extra mana to cast it and keep Negate as a backup.

    Zheng tried a Thoughtseize, which gave Robertson pause before he went to Negate it. Zheng had a Dissolve to get the discard spell through, and nabbed the Elspeth, stymieing Robertson's schemes.

    Robertson switched back to his Mutavault plan, steadily dropping Zheng's life total downwards. He tried to accelerate it with a Blood Baron of Vizkopa, but it got Dissolved as well. Zheng summoned his own, which Robertson cleared out with his Verdict. Both players threw a few more haymakers, but nothing stuck on either side before the inimitable Mutavault sealed the match for Robertson.

    Patty Robertson 2 - Jingwei Zheng 1




     

  • Quarterfinals - Ash Webster vs. Craig Chapman

    by Pip Foweraker

  • Webster started things off by dropping a trio of Planeswalkers, who were demolished with Hero's Downfalls in short order. Luckily for Webster, His Xenagos's accompanying Satyrs were enough to put Chapman on the defensive, and Webster was able to follow up with a flurry of angry dudes to take the first game.

    Ash Webster 1 - Craig Chapman 0


    Webster, R/G mage and nominee for 2014's 'Most Egregious Product Placement' award.

    The second game was Chapman's turn to apply insurmountable pressure. His first Brimaz bit the dust in short order, but he was able to keep the second around long enough - and steamroll Webster's defences with a few well-timed spells - to ride the powerful 3-drop to victory.

    Craig Chapman 1 - Ash Webster 1


    Chapman won the second game so blisteringly fast, we had to go for an 'Action Sideboarding' shot. Note the still-exhilarated judge to one side.

    Chapman spent the early game gaining a ridiculous amount of life off the combination of Obzedat, Ghost Council and Whip of Erebos. Webster went about demolishing his opponent's life total the only way his deck could: by playing an insane amount of Planeswalkers and creatures, firing off a couple of ultimates, and clobbering the heck out of his opponent, invincible ghost collective or no.

    Ash Webster 2 - Craig Chapman 1




     

  • Quarterfinals - Huang Hao-Shan vs. Wei Yifan

    by Chapman Sim

  • Game One

    After a trip to Paris, Huang found himself on the receiving end of Thoughtseize, revealing that he had been forced to keep a one lander. After missing his second land drop, Huang bounced back with double Sylvan Caryatid and Xenagos, God of Revels but Wei was happy to suppress it with Detention Sphere.

    Xenagos took form as a planeswalker this time round and Huang seemed to be back in the game, generating a couple of tokens and adding Ghor-Clan Rampager to the board. Unfortunately, the efforts were all undone with an "end of turn" Fated Retribution and Wei looked like he was firmly in control of the game, who proceeded to draw five cards off Sphinx's Revelation.

    Soon after, each of Huang's threats were deftly maneuvered, one after another. Thoughtseize got rid of Stormbreath Dragon, Syncopate dealt with Domri Rade and Detention Sphere locked down Polukranos, World Eater.

    When Jace, Architect of Thought flipped over another Sphinx's Revelation, it was enough to convince Huang to pack up his cards. There was no way he was beating another seven cards.


    Wei buries Huang with card advantage, gifted by Sphinx's Revelation.

    Game Two

    Huang mulliganed again but managed to put up a strong start comprising Sylvan Caryatid, Xenagos, the Reveler as well as Xenagos, God of Revels. Both cards started to generate a steady stream of Satyrs, with one of them becoming a 4/4 each turn.

    When Huang summoned a potentially lethal Ghor-Clan Rampager, Wei countered it with Syncopate, before untapping to drop Elspeth, Sun's Champion. However, Huang was ready with another copy of the bloodrush creature, allowing his trio of Satyrs to trample past Wei's soldiers for the win.


    Huang equalizes the score, with the aid of Xenagos in both his incarnations.

    Game Three

    Although the gods were in his deck, they certainly weren't on his side as Huang proceeded to mulligan yet again. Wei used a combination of Dissolve and Syncopates to counter Huang's Domri Rade, Stormbreath Dragon and Ruric Thar, the Unbowed.

    The attrition tango started once again, and Wei proceeded to nullify each of Huang's threats almost rhythmically. Thoughtseize plucked away Stormbreath Dragon from Huang's grip (again), and Chandra Pyromaster was rendered useless with Pithing Needle. Supreme Verdict swept the board clean, taking Ghor-Clan Rampager and Elvish Mystic with it.

    With Wei sitting at ten lands, either of the Sphinx's Revelations in his hand would seal the deal for him. Refusing to concede, Huang lay in wait as he gradually got overwhelmed by Jace, Architect of Thought and Elspeth, Sun's Champion.


    Wei Yifan defeats Huang Hao-Shan 2-1 on the back of his Sphinx's Revelations and advances to the semifinals.




     

  • Semifinals - Ash Webster vs. Nam Sung-Wook

    by Pip Foweraker

  • Sung-Wook gave Webster his only loss in the Swiss, adding a hint of dramatic foreshadowing to the match. Would this be a repeat of earlier in the weekend, or would Webster find reserves of skill and luck to power through the difficult matchup?

    Sung-Wook had a trio of early Pack Rats, gaining valuable tempo by summoning the eponymous vermin from his hand rather than needing to discard cards to make copies. Webster got off to a relatively speedy start also, with a Sylvan Caryatid, Xenagos, Courser of Kruphix and a Stormbreath Dragon.


    Sung-Wook deliberates whether to play his Nth Pack Rat.

    Unfortunately, the rats were a mite too fast for Webster's army to be able to contain, as he was forced to chump-block to stay alive and conceded shortly after. Brow furrowed, he consulted some sideboarding notes and shuffled up for the next game.

    Nam Sung-Wook 1 - Ash Webster 0

    Sung-Wook tried an early Pack Rats, but this one got shot down by Dreadbore. He followed up with a Lifebane Zombie, stripping Webster of a vital Courser of Kruphix and leaving him with a Domri Rade and a Garruk, Caller of Beasts in hand.


    Webster looks to the top of his deck for answers.

    Webster dropped the Domri Rade, but Sung-Wook had a Thoughtseize for the Garruk and a Desecration Demon to put Webster on a tight clock. A Gray Merchant of Asphodel finished things off a turn later, sending Nam Sung-Wook onto the finals after a blisteringly fast match.

    Nam Sung-Wook 2 - Ash Webster 0




     

  • Semifinals - Patty Robertson vs. Wei Yifan

    by Chapman Sim

  • Both players have successfully piloted their Esper control decks to the semifinals, bagging themselves a healthy prize check, a handful of Pro Points as well as the much-coveted invitation to Pro Tour Journey to Nyx in the process. This also meant that at least one Esper control deck would make it to the finals and both players would need to outplay the other if they wished to advance further.

    Game One

    After throwing back his initial seven, Wei found himself stuck on two Islands but had just enough mana to stop Robertson's Jace, Architect of Thought with Syncopate. After cycling Quicken, he managed to draw a crucial Temple of Enlightenment, allowing him to scry into two successive Plains.

    When Robertson baited out Dissolve using Sphinx's Revelation, that gave him free reign to slam Ætherling onto the battlefield, prompting an instant concession from Wei. Even in a deck stacked with solutions, it was not possible to come back from this dire situation.


    Down one game after stumbling on mana, Wei was now fighting an uphill battle.

    Game Two

    Wei went on the offensive and ran out Jace, Architect of Thought over two successive turns. However, Robertson was at the ready with Syncopate and Dissolve.

    Upon reaching six mana, Robertson presented his own copy of Jace and Wei allowed it to resolve, preferring to draw three cards using Sphinx's Revelation. He untapped to plop Blood Baron of Vizkopa onto the table, leaving two mana up for Gainsay. Blood Baron would not be easy to deal with post-board, for a couple of Supreme Verdicts have surely been boarded out, and Wei pummeled at his opponent's life total four by four.

    Robertson had Thoughtseize to access Wei's grip of cards, currently consisting Detention Sphere, Ætherling, Gainsay and Dissolve. After a few moments of deliberation, Robertson decided to remove Dissolve.

    Nothing else resolved for a few turns thereafter, with Gainsays and Dissolves stopping all the crucial spells. Now that both players were out of countermagic, Robertson restocked his hand with a Sphinx's Revelation for six new cards, and proceeded to drop Elspeth, protecting it against Detention Sphere with yet another Gainsay.

    With Wei holding two utterly useless Supreme Verdicts, he watched as Robertson's horde of Soldier tokens and Ætherling flood the board. Despite gaining a bunch of life from the Blood Baron of Vizkopa, that did not stop him from extending his hand as Robertson eventually ravaged through his life total.


    Patty Robertson

    Patty Robertson beats Wei Yifan and advances to the finals of Grand Prix Melbourne 2014.




     

  • Finals - Nam Sung-Wook vs. Patty Robertson

    by Pip Foweraker

  • Sung-Wook opened with a Thoughtseize, revealing a hand replete with goodies. Double Supreme Verdict, double Sphinx's Revelation, Detention Sphere and Jace, Architect of Thought stared back at him. He took the Detention Sphere, and Robertson simply laid lands and kept passing.

    Sung-Wook followed up with a Nightveil Specter, forcing Robertson to blow one of his Verdicts to keep the troublesome flier at bay. Sung-Wook snuck some damage in with a Mutavault, having used a scry land to spot an upcoming Thoughtseize.

    Robertson played an untapped Hallowed Fountain to get to Jace mana, then immediately used his draw ability to nab a Doom Blade and a land, edging him out of the danger zone. Sung-Wook finished off Jace with his Mutavault and summoned another Nightveil Specter.


    Patty Robertson

    The Specter attacked Robertson to 8, stealing an Elspeth, Sun's Champion from his library. A Thoughtseize met with a loooooong pause before Robertson revealed his hand, still with double Revelation, an therling, a Supreme Verdict and a Doom Blade. Sung-Wook took the Ætherling and Robertson took the opportunity to cast a Sphinx's Revelation for 3, going back to 11 life and hunting for answers to the troublesome flier. With two of his best win conditions gone, Robertson was under pressure to come up with the goods.

    Another attack from the Nightveil Specter landed Sung-Wook a Temple of Enlightenment, meaning he was only a single white source off being able to cast his opponent's Elspeth. Robertson fired off another Sphinx's Revelation and finally used a Last Breath to take out Sung-Wook's flier.

    Robertson summoned a Jace, Architect of Thought, whose second ability provided a split of Thoughtseize vs. Elspeth. After some thought, Robertson took the Thoughtseize. Sung-Wook cast an Underworld Connections, and Robertson spent a Dissolve to keep it off the board. A second Connections resolved, however.

    Robertson cast his Thoughtseize and saw a hand of double Hero's Downfall and a Bile Blight, taking one of the Downfalls. Sung-Wook's Mutavault started sneaking in for some damage, the Korean player ignoring Jace and aiming to pressure Robertson into acting. Robertson fired off his third Revelation for 5. His first plan of action was a Detention Sphere on Sung-Wook's Underworld Connections: if there was any card drawin' to be bein' done, the U/W player was to be the one doin' it.

    Sung-Wook kicked it up a notch with a Desecration Demon. A Supreme Verdict took care of the troublesome little spice weasel and Thoughtseize cleared out Sung-Wook's second Hero's Downfall before summoning an Elspeth. Sung-Wook cast a Gray Merchant of Asphodel, sapping Robertson back down to 10 life, and had another Underworld Connections to try and find some answers to the dangerous Planeswalker.


    Nam Sung-Wook

    Robertson summoned another Jace, Architect of Thought and went digging with it. Sung-Wook went to Bile Blight one of the Soldier tokens, but Robertson offed it with a Doom Blade to keep his army ticking over. Sung-Wook had a Thoughtseize, giving him an option of Robertson's final Sphinx's Revelation, a Supreme Verdict, Syncopate, Detention Sphere or a Dissolve. Holding two Gray Merchants of Asphodel in hand and with his opponent on 10 life, he took the Revelation.

    Sung-Wook attacked with his Gray Merchant, who got gang-blocked by a pile of Soldier tokens. Returning the attack, Robertson swung with all his Soldier tokens and a Mutavault, keen to push his offence. Sung-Wook ate a Soldier with his Mutavault and took the rest, falling to 10. Another attack, and Robertson took the epic first game and sent both players to their sideboards.

    Patty Robertson 1 - Nam Sung-Wook 0

    A Duress from Sung-Wook revealed Jace, Elspeth, and four lands, Sung-Wook taking the Jace. Robertson played (obviously) lands for a few turns, while Sung-Wook summoned a Nightveil Specter and began attacking with it.

    Sung-Wook followed up with an Erebos, God of the Dead. Robertson had a Mutavault, while Sung-Wook used Erebos's Greed ability to dig for more threats. While Sung-Wook was tapped out, Robertson fired off a Sphinx's Revelation for 2.

    Robertson cast an Elspeth, Sun's Champion, which Sung-Wook countered with a Dissolve from his Nightveil Specter. Sung-Wook then summoned a Desecration Demon and attacked with his Specter and Erebos. Robertson had a Thoughtseize, knocking himself to 5 life before casting a Supreme Verdict to clear out the Specter and Demon.

    A Duress took Robertson's Fated Retribution and another Nightveil Specter made an appearance. With his hand stripped and his life total dropping, Robertson scooped up his cards and headed for the decider.

    Nam Sung-Wook 1 - Patty Robertson 1

    Sung-Wook's opening Duress saw a pair of Jace's and a Detention Sphere, the latter heading straight to the graveyard. Robertson cast some discard of his own, his Thoughtseize seeing Erebos, Nightveil Specter, Lifebane Zombie and triple Mutavault. He took the Zombie, but Sung-Wook drew and summoned another. Robertson cast one of his Jace's and started creeping his loyalty count upwards.

    Sung-Wook attacked the Jace with his Zombie, then summoned an Erebos. Robertson dug furiously with his Jace and scored a Mutavault and a Plains. Sung-Wook summoned another Lifebane Zombie, revealing a Last Breath and Robertson's remaining Jace. With the fresh information, Sung-Wook attacked Robertson with his Mutavault and Erebos and went to take out Jace with one of his Zombies.

    Robertson cast a Detention Sphere in the nick of time to take out both of Sung-Wook's Zombies and de-activate Erebos, buying himself some valuable breathing time. Sung-Wook attacked with both of his Mutavaults and Robertson threw one of his own in as a blocker, happy to trade lands for life and time.

    Robertson summoned his second Jace, Architect of Thought, then took a Revoke Existence over a Dissolve and a Mutavault, then exiled Sung-Wook's Erebos. A Duress revealed Robertson holding a pair of lands, leading Sung-Wook's Mutavaults to take out the Planeswalker in short order. Nightveil Specter joined the battlefield, the Mutavaults cracked in, Robertson scooped up his cards, and just like that, the tournament was over.

    Congratulations to Nam Sung-Wook, your Grand Prix: Melbourne champion!




     

  • Top 5 Cards

    by Chapman Sim



  • 5. Fated Retribution

    It's been a while since an instant speed "Wrath of God" effect has been printed and control players are happy to supplement their removal suite with a board wiper that did not require them to tap out. Planeswalkers have always been the bane of control decks and Fated Retribution conveniently removes them while keeping friendly Detention Spheres safe from harm. Wei Yifan went to the extent of playing two copies in the maindeck, a testament of how good the card is in the Esper control archetype.





    4. Xenagos, God of Revels &
    Xenagos, the Reveler

    The combination of both his incarnations is more than sufficient for Red Green based decks to make a resurgence, providing resilience against control decks by being so difficult to remove. Red Green decks will continue to be a menace in the metagame, especially while partner-in-crime Domri Rade is in the mix.





    3. Courser of Kruphix

    One of the best cards introduced in Born of the Gods, this nifty Centaur is tough enough to deter incoming attackers and conveniently gains the owner some life while generating card advantage. The "Jack of all Trades" found homes in Ash Webster's Jund deck, as well as Huang Hao-Shan's Red Green Monsters archetype and some Simic brews utilizing Kiora, the Crashing Wave.





    2. Sphinx's Revelation

    Old habits die hard. Players love to draw cards and its difficult to kick the habit. Nowadays, either you go really fast and kill the control player before this card gets out of hand, or you simply get buried by the insane card advantage. Good enough to send Patty Robertson to the finals and two other players into the Top 8, Sphinx's Revelation will continue to be force to be reckoned with, until the next Standard rotation. Temple of Enlightenment deserves an honorable mention too!





    1. Pack Rat

    Nope, we're not quite done yet. Ever since its dominance in the world Return to Ravnica Limited, these pesky rodents continue to dominate in Standard. Exponential growth is often unfair, and when paired with Thoughtseize, it can mean a swift death for the unprepared. Champion Nam Sung-Wook was always first to finish his Top 8 matches, thanks to the raw brutality of Pack Rat.






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