The Lexicon Archive

  • Print

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

 

ae·o·li·pile  
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary:
Variant(s): or e·o·li·pile
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin aeolipilae; Aeolus god of the winds + pila a ball
: an apparatus consisting chiefly of a closed vessel (as a globe or cylinder) with one or more projecting bent tubes, through which steam is made to pass from the vessel, causing it to revolve. Such an apparatus was first described by Hero of Alexandria in ~200 B.C. It has often been called the first steam engine.

A·mu·ga·ba  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: Like many Magic card names, Amugaba has its roots in a foreign language - in this case from the Ugandan name Mugaba. The naming team thought Mugaba meant "one whose animal totem is an eel," and thus would have been very appropriate for the card. However, upon closer inspection of the research source, they realized that they had looked at the wrong entry! Mugaba really meant "given by God," and the name that corresponded with eel-totem was actually Mubiru. Regardless, they decided that "Amugaba" sounded better than "Amubiru," so the name was kept.

an·u·rid  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: Like cephalid and aven before it, anurid comes from a species related name, in this case anuran, which is the name of the order of animal that include frogs and toads.

a·qua·moe·ba  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: Splitting this word up in half will make it a lot easier to see its origin: aqua-, meaning "water," and amoeba, a primitive life form which is often thought of as shapeless and changing.

ark  
From dictionary.com:
Function: noun
1 : A chest, or coffer. [Obs.]
"Bearing that precious relic in an ark." --Spenser.
2 : (Jewish Hist.) The oblong chest of acacia wood, overlaid with gold, which supported the mercy seat with its golden cherubs, and occupied the most sacred place in the sanctuary. In it Moses placed the two tables of stone containing the ten commandments. Called also the Ark of the Covenant.

as·tro·labe  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Medieval Latin; Middle French, from Medieval Latin astrolabium, from Late Greek astrolabion, from Greek astrolabos, from astr- + lambanein to take
Date: 14th century
: a compact instrument used to observe and calculate the position of celestial bodies before the invention of the sextant

 

ben·thic  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: adjective
Etymology: benthos
Date: 1902
1 : of, relating to, or occurring at the bottom of a body of water
2 : of, relating to, or occurring in the depths of the ocean

bey  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Turkish, gentleman, chief
Date: 1595
1 a : a provincial governor in the Ottoman Empire b : the former native ruler of Tunis or Tunisia
2 -- used as a courtesy title in Turkey and Egypt

bur·geon  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: intransitive verb
Etymology: Middle English burjonen, from burjon bud, from Old French, from (assumed) Vulgar Latin burrion-, burrio, from Late Latin burra fluff, shaggy cloth
Date: 14th century
1 a : to send forth new growth (as buds or branches) : sprout b : bloom
2 : to grow and expand rapidly : flourish

 

ca·bal  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
1 : the artifices and intrigues of a group of persons secretly united to bring about an overturn or usurpation especially in public affairs; also : a group engaged in such artifices and intrigues
Etymology: French cabale cabala, intrigue, cabal, from Medieval Latin cabbala cabala, from Late Hebrew qabbAlAh, literally, received (lore)
Date: 1614

cairn  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English (Sc) carne, from Scottish Gaelic carn; akin to Old Irish & Welsh carn cairn
Date: 15th century
: a heap of stones piled up as a memorial or as a landmark
- cairned adjective

cal·de·ra  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Spanish, literally, caldron, from Late Latin caldaria
Date: 1691
: a volcanic crater that has a diameter many times that of the vent and is formed by collapse of the central part of a volcano or by explosions of extraordinary violence

Can·ti·vore  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: Like the atogs, the Odyssey lhurgoyfs were named with their abilities in mind. For example, Cantivore was derived from the word incantation, which has a very strong magical feel to it. Thus, a Cantivore derives power from magical energy, which is one way to describe what enchantments would be in the "real" world. Along the same lines, Magnivore takes its root from magnify, which describes what happens to emotions in red, and so on.

ceph·a·lid  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: Both of the major new species introduced in Odyssey are named after the type of animal they're based on. "Aven," of course, comes from the word avian, as in bird. "Cephalid" is derived in much the same way from cephalopod, which is the class of animal that includes squid, cuttlefish, and octopi.

Chlor·o·phant  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: It's pretty easy to see where this name came from if you divide it in half: first, there's chloro-, as in "chlorophyll," so this is a being made out of plant matter. Then there's -phant, as in "elephant," signaling that this creature can get pretty big, which it can.

 

did·ger·i·doo  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Variant(s): also did·jer·i·doo
Function: noun
Etymology: probably of imitative origin
Date: 1919
: a large bamboo or wooden trumpet of the Australian Aborigines

dop·pel·gäng·er  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Variant(s): or dop·pel·gang·er
Function: noun
Etymology: German Doppelgänger, from doppel- double + -gänger goer
Date: 1851
1 : a ghostly counterpart of a living person
2 a : double; b : alter ego; c : a person who has the same name as another

dro·ver  
From dictionary.com:
Function: noun
: One who drives cattle or sheep to market; one who makes it his business to purchase cattle, and drive them to market.
"Why, that's spoken like an honest drover; so they sell bullocks." --Shak.

 

ed·dy  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural eddies
Etymology: Middle English (Scots dialect) ydy, probably from Old Norse itha
Date: 15th century
1 a : a current of water or air running contrary to the main current; especially : a circular current : whirlpool b : something moving similarly
2 : a contrary or circular current (as of thought or policy)

Ee·sha  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer: Function: proper noun
Etymology: Character names sometimes take even more time to create than normal card names. The original "placeholder" name given to this character by Judgment author Will McDermott was "Killian." However, the naming team decided it was too based in real world culture, clashing too much with Kirtar and Teroh. "Eesha" was chosen for a few reasons: the "a" ending is generally feminine, reflecting this character's gender; the long "e" sounds in the name echo bird calls, and the name in general sounds softer than those of her two predecessors, hinting at her (somewhat) more reasonable personality.

e·pi·cen·ter  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: New Latin epicentrum, from epi- + Latin centrum center
Date: 1887
1 : the part of the earth's surface directly above the focus of an earthquake
2 : center <the epicenter of world finance>
epi·cen·tral adjective

er·satz  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: adjective
Etymology: German ersatz-, from Ersatz, n., substitute
Date: 1875
: being a usually artificial and inferior substitute or imitation [ersatz turf] [ersatz intellectuals]
- ersatz noun

 

flow·stone  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Date: 1925
: calcite deposited by a thin sheet of flowing water usually along the walls or floor of a cave

fu·ma·role  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Italian fumarola, from Italian dialect (Neapolitan), from Late Latin fumariolum vent, from Latin fumarium smoke chamber for aging wine, from fumus
Date: 1811
: a hole in a volcanic region from which hot gases and vapors issue
- fu·ma·rol·ic adjective

fyl·gja  
From www.stevenforrest.com:
Function: noun
Etymology: Icelandic fylgja
: a personal follower that took the form of an animal or a human-like spirit of the opposite gender. The fylgja usually could be seen only in dreams, by someone gifted with "second sight," or near the moment of death. Some mythologists have argued that Odin's ravens, Hugin and Munin (Thought and Memory), who bring him news about the Nine Worlds each day, are actually his fylgjur.

 

gor·gon  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin Gorgon-, Gorgo, from Greek GorgOn
1 capitalized : any of three snake-haired sisters in Greek mythology whose appearance turns the beholder to stone
2 : an ugly or repulsive woman
- Gor·go·ni·an adjective

grape·shot  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Date: 1747
1 : an antipersonnel weapon consisting of a cluster of small iron balls shot from a cannon

Gur·zi·gost  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: This is one of the rare cases with absolutely no etymology behind it; Brady Dommermuth (Magic's creative director) just started going crazy with syllables and such on the white board, and eventually came up with something cool-sounding that we liked.

 

hec·a·tomb  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin hecatombe, from Greek hekatombE, from hekaton hundred + -bE; akin to Greek bous cow
Date: circa 1592
1 : an ancient Greek and Roman sacrifice of 100 oxen or cattle
2 : the sacrifice or slaughter of many victims

hi·ero·phant  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Late Latin hierophanta, from Greek hierophantEs, from hieros + phainein to show
Date: 1677
1 : a priest in ancient Greece; specifically : the chief priest of the Eleusinian mysteries
2 a : expositor b : advocate
- hi·ero·phan·tic adjective

ho·mun·cu·lus  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural ho·mun·cu·li
Etymology: Latin, diminutive of homin-, homo human being
Date: 1656
1 : a little man : manikin
2 : a miniature adult that in the theory of preformation is held to inhabit the germ cell and to produce a mature individual merely by an increase in size

Hyp·nox  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: The first half of the word comes from "hypnosis," which is a pretty mild way of saying what happens when this guy makes someone remove his entire hand from the game. As for the second half, well, the folks responsible for names always joke that certain letters just make names sound cool by their mere presence, letters like "K," "Z," and, yes, "X." This is probably one of those names that proves the joke true.

hy·po·chon·dria  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, plural, upper abdomen (formerly regarded as the seat of hypochondria), from Greek, literally, the parts under the cartilage (of the breastbone), from hypo- + chondros cartilage
Date: 1668
1: extreme depression of mind or spirits often centered on imaginary physical ailments; specifically: hypochondriasis

 

I·chor·id  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: Can't figure out how to pronounce this name? It'll help if you know the root word, ichor, which means "a watery, acrid discharge from a wound or ulcer." Since this horrific creature feeds on the recently dead, it would feed on ichor, therefore its name.

in·sid·i·ous  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin insidiosus, from insidiae ambush, from insidEre to sit in, sit on, from in- + sedEre to sit
Date: 1545
1 a : awaiting a chance to entrap : treacherous b : harmful but enticing : seductive (insidious drugs)
2 a : having a gradual and cumulative effect : subtle (the insidious pressures of modern life) b of a disease : developing so gradually as to be well established before becoming apparent
- in·sid·i·ous·ly adverb
- in·sid·i·ous·ness noun

 

Jay·em·dae  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: proper noun
Etymology: Mike Davis is a long-time friend of Richard Garfield, and he helped Richard pitch the game RoboRally to Wizards of the Coast -- the fateful meeting that marked the beginning of Magic: The Gathering. Mike joined WotC along with Richard, and served as the head of R&D for a while. His full name is James Michael Davis, and his initials "JMD" are the foundation of the name "Jayemdae."

jo·kul·haups  
From www.kidscosmos.org:
Function: noun
Etymology: Icelandic jökulhlaup
: a flood created when a body of water held by a glacial dam breaks through the confining walls

ju·ju  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: of West African origin; akin to Hausa jùju fetish
Date: 1894
1 : a fetish, charm, or amulet of West African peoples
2 : the magic attributed to or associated with jujus

 

kud·zu  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Japanese kuzu
Date: 1876
: an Asian leguminous vine (Pueraria lobata syn. P. thunbergiana) that is used for forage and erosion control and is often a serious weed in the southeastern U.S.

 

La·qua·tus  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: proper noun
Etymology: This sly, sinister character's name is a fusion of two pieces: aqua, which means water, and loquacious, which means "talkative." Since Laquatus is an underwater being who uses a lot of talk to get what he wants, this name describes him quite well.

leg·er·de·main  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French leger de main light of hand
Date: 15th century
1 : sleight of hand
2 : a display of skill or adroitness

lea  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Variant(s): or ley
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English leye, from Old English lEah; akin to Old High German lOh thicket, Latin lucus grove, lux light
Date: before 12th century
1 : grassland, pasture
2 usually ley : arable land used temporarily for hay or grazing

 

Ma·ro  
From Mark Rosewater, the original Maro:
Function: noun
Etymology: During the development of Mirage, the team created a hole in rare green. I happened to have a cool idea for a creature. Bill Rose, the lead developer of Mirage, wrote down the card and labeled it "Maro," the letters he typed in when he wished to send me an internal email. Once you had enough unique letters, the program would fill in the name. Maro got you Mark Rosewater (the first two letters of each of my names.) The name stuck, and thus the Maro was born.

Mas·ti·core  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: Masticore is based off of two words. It looks like a manticore, a mythological creature with the head/body of a lion and the tail of a scorpion, which has appeared on Magic cards in the past. But the name is also based off the word masticate, meaning "to eat," which is incidentally what the Masticore is doing in the art: eating that metal object.

me·grim  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English migreime, from Middle French migraine
Date: 14th century
1 a : migraine; b : vertigo, dizziness
2 a : fancy, whim; b plural : low spirits

Me·ta·thran  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: When Urza was first forming his plan to fight the Phyrexians, he decided to create artificial beings to fight the artificial beings the Phyrexians had made themselves. He called them "Metathran" after the prefix "meta-," which is often used to indicate change, and "Thran," which is the name of the long-dead race the Phyrexians belonged to before they turned themselves into half-mechanical monstrosities.

mor·ti·pho·bia  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: Although it looks like a real word because of its recognizable roots, it really isn't. Mort means "death," and phobia means "fear," so this card expresses a "fear of death," which is probably what the poor cards in graveyard that get removed are feeling. But this word demonstrates just how convincing made-up words can sound if already know the roots.

 

na·bob  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Urdu nawwAb, from Arabic nuwwAb, plural of nA'ib governor
Date: 1612
1 : a provincial governor of the Mogul empire in India
2 : a person of great wealth or prominence

na·cre  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle French, from Old Italian naccara drum, nacre, from Arabic naqqArah drum
Date: 1718
: mother-of-pearl
- na·cre·ous adjective

nar·cis·sism  
Function: noun
From Dictionary.com:
Etymology: German Narzissismus, from Narziss; Narcissus, from Latin Narcissus
Date: 1822
1: Excessive love or admiration of oneself; conceit
2: A psychological condition characterized by self-preoccupation, lack of empathy, and unconscious deficits in self-esteem

nim·bus  
From Merriam Webster Online:
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural nim·bi; or nim·bus·es
Etymology: Latin, rainstorm, cloud; probably akin to Latin nebula cloud
Date: 1616
1 a : a luminous vapor, cloud, or atmosphere about a god or goddess when on earth b : a cloud or atmosphere (as of romance) about a person or thing
2 : an indication (as a circle) of radiant light or glory about the head of a drawn or sculptured divinity, saint, or sovereign
3 a : a rain cloud b : thunderhead; also : cumulus

ni·sho·ba  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: According to Bill "Quill" McQuillan, who was on the Invasion naming team, the word came from a foreign name (possibly Native American) that means "wolf," or is connected to the wolf somehow, and the team modified it into "nishoba." This explains why the creature looks somewhat like a cross between a wolf and a sabertooth tiger. Unfortunately, what language the original word was from, and what form it had, has been lost to the mists of time.

 

o·phid·i·an  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: adjective
Etymology: ultimately from Greek ophis
Date: 1883
: of, relating to, or resembling snakes
- ophidian noun

or·ni·thop·ter  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary ornith- + -pter (as in helicopter)
Date: 1908
: an aircraft designed to derive its chief support and propulsion from flapping wings

 

pan·a·cea  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin, from Greek panakeia, from panakEs all-healing, from pan- + akos remedy
Date: 1548
: a remedy for all ills or difficulties : cure-all
- pan·a·ce·an adjective

par·ox·ysm  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: French & Medieval Latin; French paroxysme, from Medieval Latin paroxysmus, from Greek paroxysmos, from paroxynein to stimulate, from para- + oxynein to provoke, from oxys sharp
Date: 15th century
1 : a fit, attack, or sudden increase or recurrence of symptoms (as of a disease) : convulsion [a paroxysm of coughing]
2 : a sudden violent emotion or action : outburst [a paroxysm of rage]
- par·ox·ys·mal adjective

pa·ta·gi·um  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural pa·ta·gia
1 : the fold of skin connecting the forelimbs and hind limbs of some tetrapods (as flying squirrels)
2 : the fold of skin in front of the main segments of a bird's wing
Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, gold edging on a tunic
Date: 1826

pe·dan·tic  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: adjective
1 : of, relating to, or being a pedant
2 : narrowly, stodgily, and often ostentatiously learned
3 : unimaginative, pedestrian
Date: circa 1600

Pheld·da·grif  
From Mark Rosewater, R&D senior designer:
Function: noun
Etymology: When the Ice Age/Alliances story was being fleshed out, someone came up with the word "Phelddagrif" as an anagram of "Garfield, PhD" and thought it would be a good card name as a "hidden" tribute to Richard Garfield, the game's creator. Originally the name was given to the planeswalker-goddess that would eventually be known as Freyalise, but the continuity director at the time hated it. "'Phelddagrif' doesn't sound like a nature goddess," he said, "it sounds like… like… some kind of flying purple hippo!" And thus Phelddagrif was born!

pitch·stone  
From Webster's 1998 Revised Unabridged Dictionary:
Function: noun
Etymology: translation of German Pechstein
: An igneous rock of semiglassy nature, having a luster like pitch.

prae·tor  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English pretor, from Latin praetor
Date: 15th century
: an ancient Roman magistrate ranking below a consul and having chiefly judicial functions
- prae·to·ri·al adjective
- prae·tor·ship noun

Pro·te·us  
From dictionary.com:
Function: noun
: (Class. Myth.) A sea god in the service of Neptune who assumed different shapes at will. Hence, one who easily changes his appearance or principles.

Pulse·mage  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
: a school of magic that specializes in resurrection spells
Etymology: Each Advocate has a name reflecting what it, and all creatures that carry the word in the future, generally do with its ability. So creatures with the word "Forcemage" in their names will probably belong or work in the Forcemage school of magic, and thus pump power and toughness. "Pulsemage" similarly will convey resurrection. Creative Text wanted a set of names that could carry certain types of abilities throughout different sets and different colors, and schools of magic seemed to be a good way to do it.

 

quay  
From Merriam Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: alteration of earlier key, from Middle English, from Middle French dialect cai, probably of Celtic origin; akin to Breton kae hedge, enclosure; akin to Old English hecg hedge
Date: 1696
: a structure built parallel to the bank of a waterway for use as a landing place

 

rev·e·nant  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from present participle of revenir to return
Date: 1827
: one that returns after death or a long absence
- revenant adjective

Roh·gahh  
From Steve Conard, Legends designer:
Function: proper noun
Etymology: Rohgahh's original name was "Ur-aah-ah of Kher Keep". We wanted a name that was unpronounceable by humans; it was meant to be a guttural-sounding name. During the editing process it was changed to "Uriah of Kher Keep". That name was laughable as it sounded like "Uriah Heep of Kher Keep" (Uriah Heep is the name of a band and a character in Dickens' David Copperfield). The name was subsequently changed to Rohgahh, which was a fine guttural compromise.

root·wal·la  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: When this now-popular creature was first concepted for Tempest, it was called "Chuckwalla," which is a type of American Southwestern desert lizard. Unfortunately, the name was so specific that it didn't exactly match the art that was finally returned. In the end, the naming team decided to alter the name slightly so they wouldn't create a contradiction with the art.

row·en  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
1 : a second-growth crop
Etymology: Middle English rowein, from (assumed) Old North French rewain; akin to Old French regaïn aftermath, from re- + gaïn aftermath, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German weida pasture, weidanOn to hunt for food
Date: 15th century

 

Sarc·a·tog  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: Previous atogs, with the exception of the original, had some indication of what they ate in their name. (Auratog, for example, ate enchantments.) The naming team decided to do the same for the new Odyssey atogs. However, since these guys ate two things, the job was a lot more difficult. Sarc- means "flesh," so Sarc-atog eats the "flesh of the dead," or cards in the graveyard. However, because of words like sarcophagus, sarc- also brings up images of the grave itself. Thus, this atog eats both the dead and the artifacts they're buried with.

scab·land  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Date: 1904
: a region characterized by elevated tracts of rocky land with little or no soil cover and traversed or isolated by postglacial dry stream channels -- usually used in plural

scal·pe·lex·is  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: The name for this unusual beastie came only after long wrangling with various word roots. Scalpel- comes from both "scalp" (as in what this thing lands on and what it drains from) and the surgical instrument (since it slices out bits of knowledge). The ending, -lexis, doesn't come from the car, but the word for "word," as in, oddly enough, "lexicon." Again, this emphasizes what the beast robs from the hapless opponent.

sci·on  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French cion, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German chInan to sprout, split open, Old English cInan to gape
Date: 13th century
1 : a detached living portion of a plant joined to a stock in grafting and usually supplying solely aerial parts to a graft
2 : descendant; child

sco·ri·a  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural sco·ri·ae
Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from Greek skOria, from skOr excrement
Date: 14th century
1 : the refuse from melting of metals or reduction of ores : slag
2 : rough vesicular cindery lava
- sco·ri·a·ceous adjective

scriv·en·er  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
1 : a professional or public copyist or writer : scribe
2 : notary public
Etymology: Middle English scriveiner, alteration of scrivein, from Middle French escrivein, from (assumed) Vulgar Latin scriban-, scriba, alteration of Latin scriba scribe
Date: 14th century

scu·tum  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural scu·ta
Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, shield
Date: 1771
: a bony, horny, or chitinous plate : scute

seed·time  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Date: before 12th century
1 : the season of sowing
2 : a period of original development

som·no·phore  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: Somnophore is an example of one thing the creative team likes to do a lot -- combine existing prefixes, suffixes, and bases. Somno- is Latin for sleep, and -phore is a Latin "combining noun" that means "carrier." (-Phore is used often in biological naming.) So somnophore is a "sleep carrier," and any creature that has been affected by its ability will attest to that.

spuz·zem  
From Steve Conard, Legends designer:
Function: noun
Etymology: The name of this creature is in honor of the city Spuzzum, British Columbia. That name was just too good not to use.

sym·bi·ote  
From dictionary.com:
Function: noun
: An organism in a symbiotic relationship.

 

tai·ga  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: noun
Etymology: Russian taiga
Date: 1888
: a moist subarctic forest dominated by conifers (as spruce and fir) that begins where the tundra ends

tak·kle·mag·got  
From Steve Conard, Legends designer:
Function: noun
Etymology: The name came from a funny misunderstanding of some lyrics by the Blue Oyster Cult. In their song "A Veteran of the Psychic Wars," it sounded to us like they were saying "tackle maggot." We liked the sound of that so much, we named this card after it.

tar·pan  
From Dictionary.com:
Function: noun
: A wild horse found in the region of the Caspian Sea, extinct since the early 20th century. (Equus caballus gomelini)

ther·mo·karst  
From The U.S. Global Change Research Information Office:
Function: noun
Etymology: from Greek thermE heat + German karst irregular limestone region
: a range of features formed in areas of low relief when permafrost with excess ice thaws. These are unevenly distributed and include hummocks and mounds, water- filled depressions, 'drunken' forests, mud flows on sloping ground, new fens, and other forms of thaw settlement that account for many of the geotechnical and engineering problems encountered in periglacial landscapes. Even where repeated ground freezing takes place, thermokarst features, once formed, are likely to persist.

thrall  
From dictionary.com:
Function: noun
1 : a. One, such as a slave or serf, who is held in bondage.
b. One who is intellectually or morally enslaved.
2 : Servitude; bondage: "a people in thrall to the miracles of commerce" (Lewis H. Lapham).

   

viv·i·fy  
From Merriam-Webster Online:
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Form(s): -fied; -fy·ing
1 : to endue with life or renewed life : animate (rains that vivify the barren hills)
2 : to impart vitality or vividness to (concentrating this union of quality and meaning in a way which vivifies both -- John Dewey)
Etymology: Middle French vivifier, from Late Latin vivificare, from Latin vivificus enlivening, from vivus alive
Date: 1545

 

Worm·fang  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymoogy: Creative Text knew that it wanted to reference the black Nightmares from Torment onto the blue and red versions of Judgment, and referring to their distinctive tentacles seemed to be a good fit. But in order to bring home the contrast, they were only given one tentacle each, toothed like a lamprey. They were originally called "Wormtooth" creatures, but input indicated that "Wormfang" sounded cooler.

wum·pus  
From Rei Nakazawa, Magic creative text writer:
Function: noun
Etymology: No, the word does not come from what you do with these creatures when you attack. "Wumpus" is actually a tribute to the old, old computer game "Hunt the Wumpus," which is appropriate since the only Wumpus was supposed to be Hunted Wumpus. (Thrashing Wumpus was not supposed to be a Wumpus, but rather the leeches you see on the Wumpus in the art. But the focus on them wasn't strong enough, so the card concept changed. Other cards with the Wumpus in the art include Invigorate and Foster.)

     

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Full MagicTheGathering.Com Archive

  • Planeswalker Points
  • Facebook Twitter
  • Gatherer: The Magic Card Database
  • Forums: Connect with the Magic Community
  • Magic Locator